In a Jiffy Chef Ian Kittichai

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Chef Ian Kittichai has continually been experimental and pushed the limits of notions of food – especially for Asian cuisines. A skilful student across a wide span of cuisines, Chef Kittichai’s food is a parallel for his life experience and philosophy.
Currently, he owns and runs four restaurants around the world (New York, Mumbai, Bangkok and Abu Dhabi ). His television shows air across 700 cities. At his restaurant Koh, at the Intercontinental Marine Drive Hotel in Mumbai, he whips up an interesting recipe for our readers to cook and relish.

HOT STONE RICE

INGREDIENTS

Steam Rice                    150 grams
Bell Peppers                  20 grams
Shallot                             20 grams
Oil                                      20 grams
Chilli                                 20 grams
Hot Basil                         30 grams
Oyster Sauce                 30 grams
Thai Hot Basil                30 grams
Vegetable Stock            50 ml
Sugar                                 10 grams

PREPARATION

  • Boil some long grain rice, drain and cool.
  • In a hot wok, heat oil, add some hot basil and fried garlic, season
    and toss.
  • For the sauce: add oil, sauté shallots, add water, oyster sauce and
    reduce.
  • Add the bell peppers and onion.
  • Place the rice in a hot stone bowl and mix the sauce and serve immediately.

Chefs Tip: In case you don’t have hot stone bowl, you can serve in a double bottom copper bowl.

DID YOU KNOW

  • More than 90 percent of the world’s rice is grown and consumed in Asia, where people typically eat rice two or three times a daily. Rice is the staple diet of half the world’s population.
  • It takes 5,000 litres of water to produce 1 kg of irrigated rice.
  • Rice is a great source of complex carbohydrates, which is an important source of the fuel our bodies need.
  • Rice contains no additives or preservatives, making it an excellent inclusion in a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Whole grains (such as brown rice) contain high amounts of insoluble fibre-the type of fibre some scientists believe may help protect against a variety of cancers.

Volume 1 Issue 6

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